The NFFF have just come from a call with the Department of Digital, Culture, Media and Sport which gave us advanced notice of legislation regarding the ban on advertising of HFSS foods.

The meeting was attended by McDonalds, Just Eat, UK Hospitality and Andrew Crook representing the NFFF and the British Takeaway Campaign.

We have been liaising with Government on this issue for some time and we are delighted that small businesses have been granted an exemption to the ban, which will come into effect at the end of 2022.

We have secured a number of important provisions that together will greatly minimise the extent of the ban on the smallest businesses:

  • The ban to online advertising will apply only to paid advertising, so brands’ own social media posts will be unaffected.
  • There will be an exemption from that ban for small businesses with fewer than 250 employees
  • The new rules will apply from 1st January 2023, giving operators time to recover from the financial impact of coronavirus before they take effect.

The final shape of the policy represents an admission by Government that their proposals as previously outlined would have had a disproportionate impact on the smallest operators, and the protections embedded in the law will mean that most in our industry will now be shielded from the full impact of these regulations.

NFFF President Andrew Crook said “This shows that the Government are listening to businesses both large and small to ensure that their policies are workable and do not damage the livelihoods of our hard working business owners.  Working as part of the British Takeaway Campaign means that we have a great forum to mobilise the entire sector on these key issues and support Government in making the right decisions to improve the health of the Nation whilst protecting the economy.”



NFFF President Andrew Crook appearing on Sky News on the 12th May 2021 to discuss the online advertising restriction for products high in fat, sugar and salt (HFSS)